Building a Website Part 2: Editing A Gallery



In this tutorial, I demonstrate how I use Adobe Lightroom 4.0 to edit a gallery on my new Squarespace website. In it, I demonstrate my workflow for evaluating my website and editing the images that end up in a gallery showcasing my street photography. It provides some important tips for editing one's photography to provide the best presentation and impact for a body of work. You can visit my new website by going to www.ibarionex.net.



 Visit and subscribe to my YouTube Channel by clicking here.

And take advantage of the a 14-day free trial of Squarespace to create your own photo website and blog. Click below to get started. 


TCF Google+ Hangout #1


I invited two of my friends and fellow street photographers, Dana Barsuhn and Valerie Jardin to join me in a Google+ Hangout where we talked about some of our favorite photographs and why we love street photography. It's an experiment for me, but something that I may do again. I look forward to hearing what you think. 

Ibarionex Profiled on the Adobe Lightroom Homepage

I am currently being profiled on the Adobe Lightroom Home page, which includes a video talking about my photography and The Candid Frame photography podcast.  It was filmed last last year in one of my favorite places to photograph, Downtown Los Angeles. It was a long but fun day and I got to share it with some of my favorite fellow photographers he graciously joined me. I am very honored to be acknowledged in such a way, especially around a product that I really believe in and that has made such a big difference in my photography. I hope you enjoy the short video which you can find by clicking here.

The Candid Frame #163 - Emilio Banuelos



Emilio Banuelos has worked as an editorial photographer and consultant for newspapers in Mexico, Panama and the United States. His documentary work earned him fellowships from the Poynter Institute, The Marty Forscher Fellowship for Humanistic Photography and an award from EnFoco Inc. In the San Francisco Bay Area, Emilio teaches documentary photography for the Academy of Art University, and has conducted workshops for the University of California Santa Cruz-Extension, the University of Coahuila and Black Boots Inc. You can discover more about his work by visiting his photo website or the site for Black Boots Ink

Emilio Banuelos recommends the work of Donna Ferrato


You can also subscribe to the show via iTunes by clicking here.

Or you can directly download the MP3 file by clicking here.

Visit and subscribe to my YouTube Channel by clicking here.

To take advantage of the special offer on Adobe Lightroom 4 visit the link below or go to Adobe.com


And take advantage of the a 14-day free trial of Squarespace to create your own photo website and blog. Click below to get started. 


The Candid Frame #162 - Joel Meyerowitz



Joel Meyerowitz is an award-winning photographer whose work has appeared in over 350 exhibitions in museums and galleries around the world. He was born in New York in 1938. He began photographing in 1962. He is a “street photographer” in the tradition of Henri Cartier-Bresson and Robert Frank, although he works exclusively in color. As an early advocate of color photography (mid-60’s), Meyerowitz was instrumental in changing the attitude toward the use of color photography from one of resistance to nearly universal acceptance. His first book, Cape Light, is considered a classic work of color photography and has sold more than 100,000 copies during its 30-year life. He is the author of 17 other books, including the newly released book by Aperture,Legacy: The Preservation of Wilderness in New York City Parks.You can find out more about Joel and his work by visiting his website.

Listen to our first interview with Joel on Episode 19 of the Candid Frame. 

Click on the image above for more information on his latest book, Taking My Time. Visit the Phaidon website to view the short video mentioned by Joel in our interview. 


Joel recommends the work of Paul Strand  and Alex Soth 



You can also subscribe to the show via iTunes by clicking here.

Or you can directly download the MP3 file by clicking her

Visit and subscribe to my YouTube Channel by clicking here

To take advantage of the special offer on Adobe Lightroom 4 visit the link below or go to Adobe.com





The Candid Frame #154 - Valerie Jardin

Valerie Jardin is a versatile photographer who shoots interiors and architecture where the details tell the story. She also photographs food and loves working with culinary artists on location. Portraiture work gives her the opportunity to photograph people in their environment and capture their true personality.

She also has a passion for street photography, writing and educating other photographers. Her articles appear regularly in the Digital Photography School online magazine and she teaches workshops including a street photography through the street of Paris. You can discover more about her and her work by visiting her website and blog

Valerie Jardin recommends the work of Jim Brandenburg


Click below to stream the interview.

 You can also subscribe to the show via iTunes by clicking here.

Or you can directly download the MP3 file by clicking here.

Meeting Maury Edelstein

While I was in San Francisco yesterday, I spent some time shooting in the city with my friend Emilio. I was walking down Market Street when I spotted this dapper fellow making images with a small Canon camera. He was making images of a postal worker.

I struck up a conversation with him to discover that he had been photographing in this area for quite a long time and as people passed by, it seemed like he was familiar with a lot of them and they him. Visiting his website afterwards, I realized that he had accumulated a large body of work.

But what really impressed me was the wonderful energy he brought to the street. A lot of street photographers can be very earnest about their work, but he seemed to be having a lot of fun. He was really having a ball being out there in the street getting his shots. And the fact that he was doing it with such a stylus ensemble of hat, tie and shoes really impressed me.

As I told Emilio later, I could only hope that I had that much energy and enthusiasm thirty years from now.

I meet a lot of photographers on the street, but Maury definitely left me inspired.

You can check out his impressive work by visiting his website.

Surf's Up: Hands on with the Olympus OM-D E-M5


You would think that living in Southern California during the summer, I wouldn't need much reason to head out to the beach and  enjoy all that it has to offer. The weather combined with the energy of the crowds can make for a great time outdoors, especially for the photographer. 

The reality is that I've not hit the shores, much less the water this season, which is why I was excited about an invitation from Olympus to use some their latest cameras during the Surf City competition in Huntington Beach. 

I had about three hours to go out shooting with the OM-D E-M5 as well as  the TG-1 iHS, their waterproof compact camera. So, this isn't an exhaustive and detailed review. That's something for another day if and when I can use the camera for a longer period of time. But for those curious about this model, I thought it would be interesting to share my experience with it and some of the images that I produced that day. 

Now, I have been a big fan of the Olympus Pen-series of camera, particularly the Olympus PEN EP-3, which is the first digital camera in my experience with fast enough autofocus to make it viable as a definitive street photography camera. The shutter lag/ focus delay in many cameras even the highest end DSLR made spontaneous and instantaneous street shooting a challenge, if not frustrating. So, when I heard that the the OM-D E-M5 had improved on that autofocus system, but in a design more in line with a DSLR, my curiosity was peaked. 
Within moments of getting the camera in my hand, I knew that the autofocus response that I had come to enjoy with the EP-3 was being delivered here. My ability to recognize the potential of a scene, compose my shot and make the photograph was not hampered in the least by the camera hunting for focus or even the slightest lag. I didn't have to slightly depress the shutter button halfway to detect focus before hand as I often have to do with many other cameras in order to ensure I capture that critical moment and produce a sharp, in-focus photograph. 

Unlike many of the current breed of mirror-less cameras, the OM-D E-M5 features an OLED viewfinder as well a LCD display. Now, I'm never been a fan of these, having a been so accustomed to a traditional optical viewfinder. But I have to admit, I really liked that image I saw looking through the viewfinder. It's as close to the "real thing" as anything I've seen thus far in the form of an EVF. 

After a short time getting familiar with the controls of the camera including how to toggle back and forth between the EVF and the LCD, I got to shooting, focusing on a variety of subject primarily the people that were enjoying the venues at the Surf City event. For me, it was opportunity to shoot street, but with a lot more sand and less clothing that I am usually accustomed to seeing on the streets of Los Angeles. 

The compact size of the camera particularly with the Olympus 12mm f/2 lens (24mm equivalent) made it a stealthy and compact alternative to the what now seems like a beast of a DSLR. This afforded me the ability to get in closer to my subject than I normally would feel comfortable when using a bigger camera, but which is especially important when using a wide angle. 

I found myself quickly winding through the crowds capturing the ever-changing scenes around me. Despite the high contrast lighting , the camera's metering handled exposure well, which was particularly important because I was recording jpegs rather than raw files to get a real sense of what this camera was capable of. 

The camera also delivered when it came to capturing action in the form of skateboarders doing acrobatics that made my body ache just watching it. It was also the right tool when it came time to make a portrait. In each shooting situation, I didn't find myself wanting for my DSLR with respect to certain features or controls. 



The camera features a set of art filters, which some people find gimmicky, but which I have come to really enjoy, particularly the Dramatic Tone filter which provides a grungy HDR look. But when I was shown that I  could now combine filters, I quickly discovered the Pinhole and the Dramatic Tone filter in combination produced some wonderfully unexpected results. 

You have to know that when it comes to Photoshop, I am not the kind of photographer who works on achieving this look using software. I'm often pretty conservative with the degree of image manipulation I use. So, the use of these filters allowed me the opportunity to play and experiment in a way that I don't think I'd ever consider in front of my computer. So, I actively shot with the Art Filter bracketing feature enabled which allowed me to not only capture my "straight" image, but also images that received the benefit of these special looks. 

Though I wish I'd had more time to spend the day shooting, I found that the OM-D E-M5 was a mirror-less camera that really delivered on the promise of a compact, stylish design that didn't sacrifice in terms of performance. Though I'm sure that a more exhaustive review might reveal some things that I might dislike, none such issues were immediately revealed to me as I was shooting and producing these images. 

When reading other reviews, there is such a focus on what feature or control a camera doesn't have in comparison to another and while I can understand the importance of that for certain types of photography or a photographer, I am primarily concerned with whether camera will allow me to make the kinds of images I'm striving to get. I'm pleased to say that not only did the OM-D E-M5 allow me to do that, but that the resulting images were shots that I was very pleased with. It certainly made my photography that morning very, very fun. 





The Candid Frame #144 - Dana Barsuhn




Dana Barsuhn is a young LA-based photographer who honed his skill on the streets of Los Angeles and used what he has learned to serve his early work as a professional photographer. Within a short period of time, he has developed a very personal visual sensibility with his street photography, which has not only allowed him to create distinct imagery in this popular genre, but has also helped him to create unique photographs. His growth as a photographer has recently inspired him to make the leap into a full-time professional photographer, with the hopes of achieving both financial and creative success. You can find out more about his work by visiting his website and blog.

Dana Barsuhn recommends the work of Stanko Abadzic.

For streaming audio click here or subscribe to the podcast for free viaSubscribe via iTunes

The Candid Frame #143 - Rinzi Ruiz


Rinzi Ruiz is a Los Angeles-based street photographer who picked up a camera only two years ago. In that brief time, he has developed a keen eye for capturing beautiful and poignant images on the street. His rapid development as a photographer is informed from a commitment to make time for his art, as well as developing a critical eye for what works and what doesn't. Inspired by both contemporary and master photographers, his understanding of the tradition of street photography is helping him to develop a distinct voice in the genre.  You can discover more about Rinzi and his work by visiting his website and his blog.

Rinzi Ruiz recommends the work of Dana Barsuhn.


For streaming audio click here or subscribe to the podcast for free viaSubscribe via iTunes

The Candid Frame #121 - Julia Dean


Julia Dean is a photographer, educator, and the founder of the Julia Dean Photo Workshops. Julia received a Bachelor of Science degree in photography at the Rochester Institute of Technology and a Master of Arts degree in journalism at the University of Nebraska. She began her career as an apprentice to pioneering photographer Berenice Abbott. Later, Julia was a photo editor for the Associated Press in New York. She has taught for 29 years at such places as the University of Nebraska, Los Angeles Valley College, Los Angeles Southwest College, Santa Monica College, the Santa Fe Workshops, the Maine Photographic Workshops, Oxford University and the Julia Dean Photo Workshops. You find out more about her and her workshop by visiting her website.

Julia Dean recommends the work of Aline Smithson.

For streaming audio click here or subscribe to the podcast for free viaSubscribe via iTunes

The Candid Frame #118 - Eric Kim



Eric Kim is a street photographer currently residing in Los Angeles. He specializes in black and white street photography, and has taken photos from all over the globe, including places such as Paris, Rome, Florence, Venice, Cinque Terre, Prague, London, and Korea. The images that you see in his work are mostly of candid street photography of people in their natural environments. He has a fantastic blog dedicated to street photography from all over the world as well as a series of YouTube videos in which he speaks of his journey as a street photographer. You can discover more about him by visiting his website, his blog and his YouTube channel.

For streaming audio click here or subscribe to the podcast for free viaSubscribe via iTunes

Here is one video that captures his approach using a GoPro camera.

Eric Kim recommends the work of DirtyHarrry on Flickr.

Click here to read my experience studying in his street photography workshop.

Ibarionex on Nik Photo Radio

Ibarionex appears this week on the Nik Photo Radio podcast. On the show, he discusses his approach to light and photographing strangers at home and abroad. Scott Sheppard does a great job with the show, which includes not only information on Nik's line of software but also interview with some great photographers who have also appeared on The Candid Frame. You can discover this and other episodes by visiting their website. or subscribing to their show on iTunes.